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Article
February 6, 1943

HERNIATED INTERVERTEBRAL DISK: A STUDY OF THE IODIZED OIL COLUMN THE PROCAINE TEST IN DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS FROM REFLECTED SCIATIC PAIN

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY

From the Departments of Surgery, Neurosurgical Service and Orthopedics, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1943;121(6):390-401. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840060008002
Abstract

Herniated intervertebral disk, or herniation of the nucleus pulposus, has become a well established syndrome. The lesion is clearly a causal factor for low back pain associated with radiating pain in the sciatic distribution. While the incidence of herniated disks in "sciatic cases" appears to be growing ever larger, there is nevertheless a group of cases in which the back pain and sciatic radiation is related to soft tissue or myofascial injury. Out of the fog of ignorance which has hung for so long over the subject of low back pain these two lights of knowledge have appeared. Each of these two causal factors is productive of definite syndromes and lends itself by the use of proper methods to a high percentage of accurate diagnoses. They indicate prescribed methods of treatment which are rewarded by almost uniformly excellent results. Since in any case of low back pain with sciatic radiation

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