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Editorial
January 24/31, 2017

Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Taking Insulin Injections

Author Affiliations
  • 1Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, California
 

Copyright 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

JAMA. 2017;317(4):363-364. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.20327

The therapeutic goal for patients with diabetes is achievement of normal glucose concentrations, without causing hypoglycemia. Patients with type 1 diabetes alter the timing and dosing of insulin to achieve this goal. The majority of patients with type 1 diabetes use daily insulin injections and adjust insulin administration based on preprandial and postprandial self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) values. Real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has the potential to improve diabetes control by limiting hyperglycemia, decreasing episodes of hypoglycemia, lowering glucose variability (although its importance in affecting clinical events has yet to be shown), and enhancing patient satisfaction with glycemic treatment. However, most patients in whom CGM has been compared with SMBG have used insulin pumps.1,2 Therefore, an important question is whether CGM will improve diabetes control in patients with type 1 diabetes who inject insulin.

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