[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.238.190.122. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 13, 1943

THE REPAIR OF CRANIAL DEFECTS WITH TANTALUM: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, U. S. NAVAL RESERVE

From the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, McGill University Faculty of Medicine and the Montreal Neurological Institute, and from the Departments of Surgery and Pathology, National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Md.

JAMA. 1943;121(7):478-481. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840070006002
Abstract

The surgeon planning repair of a cranial defect has a large number of methods from which to choose. At the present time the most favored technics are those which employ autogenous tissues, particularly bone and cartilage. However, the use of substances alien to the host has continued despite the popular aversion to the production of a foreign body reaction. Furthermore, enthusiasm for the alloplastic materials has recently been revived by the encouraging reports of Geib,1 Beck2 and Peyton and Hall3 on the repair of cranial defects with vitallium. In this paper certain observations on the experimental and clinical use of tantalum for this purpose are reported.

Before I discuss the alloplastic methods it is well to consider the advantages and disadvantages attending the use of autografts. Bone is obtained either from the adjacent skull, with the Müller-König technic or one of its modifications, or from the ribs,

×