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Article
February 13, 1943

THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE CHOLECYSTITIS: AN EVALUATION

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Surgical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;121(7):481-485. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840070009003
Abstract

The great variability of the clinical course and pathologic picture of acute cholecystitis requires the individualized treatment of this condition. This has not been common practice. Instead, rigid, and to a certain extent contradictory, plans of treatment have been recommended. These range from operating early, as in appendicitis, to delaying surgery until the acute manifestations of the disease have entirely subsided. Both methods have much to commend them and no doubt have favorably influenced the treatment of this condition. This controversy, however, has not been without danger, since attempts to assimilate and apply the two methods have been confusing to the practitioner. In recent years at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital each patient with acute cholecystitis has been treated as an individual surgical problem.1 The results have been so satisfactory and the mortality rate so much improved that a restatement of our views and a clarification of the issues

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