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Article
February 13, 1943

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH IN PSYCHOSOMATIC PROBLEMS

JAMA. 1943;121(7):517. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840070045015
Abstract

In recent years the development of medicine has revealed increasing interest in the patient as a whole. Whereas recent discoveries in pharmacology, biochemistry and endocrinology may be more spectacular, they are likely to make us overlook the steadily growing need of integrating all this specialized knowledge in the light of the functions and structure of the total organism. Logically psychiatry became the focus for crystallization of these unifying tendencies. Dr. William Allen White pointed out that psychiatry deals with the total reactions of the organism. In somatic medicine the patient's stomach, liver or blood vessels are the doctor's concern; in psychiatry the patient's actions are investigated. Psychosomatic medicine attempts to bring together these two points of view. In the psychosomatic approach the investigators seek to find the relationship between what the stomach is doing and what the patient as a whole is doing. How do the patient's emotions, his effort,

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