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Article
February 20, 1943

A MECHANISM OF FATIGUE IN NEUROPSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine; CHICAGO

From the Medical Department of the Michael Reese Hospital and the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1943;121(8):569-573. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840080017004
Abstract

Fatigue is frequently observed in patients with neuropsychiatric complaints. The mechanism by which fatigue is produced has been little understood by either neuropsychiatrists or others. This preliminary report presents evidence suggesting one of the possible mechanisms and the animal experimentation on which the procedures adopted are based.

Spontaneous hypoglycemia has been noted by many investigators who have attempted to define the variety of settings in which it occurs. Previously Harris,1 Ross and Josephs2 and more recently Wauchope,3 Conn, Wilder and others have reviewed the subject.

Blood sugar levels may fall following interference with many factors in the normal homeostatic mechanism. Liver disease and disease of the pancreas, either from known adenoma or from hyperplasia of the islands of Langerhans, have been cited as the important factors which may cause spontaneous hypoglycemia. Faulty dieting, including errors in intake of carbohydrates and the lack of assimilable vitamins, has also

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