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Article
February 20, 1943

LEAD INTOXICATION FROM A BULLET LODGED IN THE SPHENOID SINUS AND SURGICAL REMOVAL OF THE NIDUS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE, RETIRED

JAMA. 1943;121(8):580-582. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.62840080001006
Abstract

The present war era will undoubtedly result in an intensified study of the effects of retained lead, and a brief review of the possibilities in such cases is apropos at this time. Lead intoxication from absorption by way of the mucous membrane of the nasal mucosa is rare: secondly, the removal of a bullet lodged in the sphenoid sinus is an unusual problem of surgery.

There has been some change in opinion from that expressed by Ambroise Paré1 in the sixteenth century: "Experience teaches us that lead (which some say is poisonous because mercury is derived from it) can remain a long time in our bodies without causing any corruption: as we can recognize in those cases of arquebus wounds where the ball has remained in the flesh a space of three, four and even ten years, and has moved from top to bottom without causing any putrefaction or

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