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Article
June 15, 1935

TREATMENT OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS WITH FEVER INDUCED BY DIATHERMY: A FOLLOW-UP STUDY

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and the Medical Clinic of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

JAMA. 1935;104(24):2165-2168. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760240025009
Abstract

Since the preliminary report by Neymann and Osborne1 in 1929 of the employment of high frequency currents in the production of fever, the therapeutic use of this method has been rapidly extended to various chronic diseases. At the same time, other methods such as the use of short radio waves and radiant and conducted heat have been employed, all successful in raising and sustaining a patient's temperature in a controlled manner. That chronic arthritis should have been one of the first diseases to be tried seems natural, since local heat to the joints, hot baths and fever induced by typhoid vaccine have long occupied a prominent place in its therapy. It is our purpose in this paper, after briefly reviewing the published reports of others who have utilized artificial fever, to summarize the end results in twenty-five cases of rheumatoid (atrophic) arthritis treated with fever produced by general diathermy.

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