[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 27, 1943

PREMEDICAL AND MEDICAL EDUCATION AS RELATED TO THE UNITED STATES ARMY

Author Affiliations

Assistant Chief of Staff for Personnel, Services of Supply WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1943;121(9):633-635. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840090003002
Abstract

An invitation to address the Annual Congress on Medical Education and Licensure is a privilege laymen do not ordinarily receive. Consequently, as I reviewed the program and noted the qualifications of the speakers, the thought occurred that perhaps I was invited as an antidote. I accepted the invitation with the belief that I could help the members of the congress understand some of the Army's educational problems and the hope that the Army might thus receive still further aid from the medical profession.

My father practiced medicine and surgery in Winston-Salem, N. C., for many years, and if you will accept my deep respect—my affection—for your profession as a substitute for medical training, we can perhaps find more common ground and more mutual interests than might first be supposed.

Our goals are similar, although the fields in which we work are different. Physicians were the original trained personnel managers, and

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×