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Article
February 27, 1943

OBSERVATIONS ON THE PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF PEPTIC ULCER

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

JAMA. 1943;121(9):640-646. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840090010005
Abstract

When one approaches the problem of peptic ulcer one is confronted with a bewildering mass of data concerning its pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment. Since preventive and effective treatment depends on a knowledge of the cause of ulcer, it is of interest to consider at once the factors apparently involved in its incidence and its production.

INCIDENCE IN MILITARY AND CIVILIAN POPULATIONS  From many quarters today come reports of the increasing incidence of peptic ulcer since the beginning of the war.1 This is true in European countries as well as in America, especially in the military forces. Whether ulcer is actually affecting an increasing number of persons or whether it is being recognized in persons not previously suspected of having it will depend on a critical analysis of the situation after the war is over. It has been suggested that the large scale physical examination of draftees has brought

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