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Article
February 27, 1943

SUBDURAL HEMATOMA AND EFFUSION AS A RESULT OF BLAST INJURIES: FIRST PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE; UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE; UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE

From the Neuropsychiatric and Neurosurgical Services, U. S. Naval Hospital, Oakland, Calif.

JAMA. 1943;121(9):664-666. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840090034010
Abstract

Our purpose in this report is to bring forth a complication of war injuries which differs from trauma sustained in civilian life. This condition could be overlooked and the individual patient relegated to chronic invalidism or discharge from service with a diagnosis of a functional disorder, such as psychoneurosis or war neurosis.

Subdural hematoma is not an uncommon complication of craniocerebral trauma, usually the result of a direct blow to the skull, varying in degree of intensity. It has been shown that the hematoma occurs following the rupture of small veins, either between the layers of the dura or between the inner surface of the dura and the arachnoid.

Because of the poor absorptive action, due to a scanty blood supply to these membranes, the hematomas seldom disappear spontaneously. The blood contained in the subdural effusion or hematomatous mass undergoes chemical disintegration, giving rise to an entrapped liquid of higher

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