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Article
July 11, 1931

THE PRESENT STATUS OF HOOKWORM IN THE SOUTH

JAMA. 1931;97(2):92-93. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730020020006
Abstract

There seems to be a widespread belief among certain public health men, practicing physicians and laymen that hookworm disease has been so reduced by the control campaigns in the southern part of the United States that it is no longer of any importance as a public health problem. There is no doubt that the extensive treatment campaigns inaugurated by the Rockefeller Sanitary Commission followed by the development of programs for rural sanitation by the various state boards of health have greatly reduced the hookworm infestation over wide areas throughout the South. In fact, statistics from resurveys in the past several years show marked reduction in both incidence and intensity. More often than not, however, these resurveys also show that there are still present areas of heavy infestation and clinical hookworm disease. In a recent publication Stiles,1 while recognizing the validity of the evidence for hookworm reduction, makes it perfectly

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