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Article
June 29, 1935

A STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED CASES OF SKULL FRACTURES: FOLLOWED FROM FIVE TO THIRTEEN YEARS

Author Affiliations

CINCINNATI
From the Department of Surgery of the College of Medicine of the University of Cincinnati and the Cincinnati General Hospital.

JAMA. 1935;104(26):2332-2333. doi:10.1001/jama.1935.02760260020007

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Abstract

My purpose in this report is to present a study of the condition of patients several years after a severe skull fracture. An attempt has been made to determine the effect of age, type of skull fracture, and treatment on the ultimate general condition of the patient.

The mortality in a large series of skull fractures treated in this clinic was studied by Dr. B. N. Carter in 1927. He found a total mortality rate of 37.2 per cent in 389 cases irrespective of associated injuries and length of time the patients survived. Excluding the cases that were moribund or obviously hopelessly injured, the mortality rate was 18.1 per cent.

At that time Dr. Carter also outlined the method of treatment employed in the series of patients on which the present report is based. Patients with the following conditions were operated on as soon as practicable: (a) compound fractures, depressed

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