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Article
March 13, 1943

THE HEALTH AND SAFETY PROGRAM OF THE U. S. MARITIME COMMISSION: AND THE U. S. NAVY IN CONTRACT SHIPYARDS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Industrial Hygiene, Harvard School of Public Health, and Health Consultant to the U. S. Maritime Commission BOSTON

JAMA. 1943;121(11):822-823. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840110024009
Abstract

The Maritime Commission and the Navy together now employ about a million workers, men and women, in contract shipyards. These yards do not include government navy yards such as those at Brooklyn, Norfolk and Mare Island. In the case of the Maritime Commission general policies emanate from Washington, but the contract supervision comes from Maritime's regional directors at the four offices in Philadelphia, New Orleans, Oakland and Chicago. In the case of the Navy, supervision emanates from the Supervisor of Ships in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy and then through the Navy's representatives at the yards themselves and in the appropriate Navy District offices.

In both cases contracts are let by the commission or by the Navy to private contractors. Methods used, general processes and the like are left to the contractor, the government keeping hands off except for inspections, leading toward final approval and acceptance

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