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March 20, 1943

STUDIES ON THE ACTION OF QUINIDINE IN MAN: II. INTRAMUSCULAR ADMINISTRATION OF A SOLUBLE PREPARATION OF QUINIDINE IN THE TREATMENT OF ACUTE CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Research Laboratories of the Beth Israel Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1943;121(12):917-920. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840120019005
Abstract

Soluble preparations of quinidine sulfate for parenteral administration have not been readily available. Quinine dihydrochloride has been administered intramuscularly or intravenously.1 Dilute solutions of quinidine sulfate in dextrose or water2 and even suspensions of quinidine sulfate tablets in hot water and hydrochloric acid3 have been administered in emergencies, but there are important objections to these procedures.

The necessity for a soluble preparation of quinidine suitable for parenteral administration in treating acute cardiac arrhythmias is obvious, especially when the abnormal rhythm is associated with vomiting, collapse, unconsciousness or other conditions in which absorption from the gastrointestinal tract is uncertain or delayed. A prolonged search of the American market for a soluble preparation has been unsuccessful. The Cinchona Products Institute, however, suggested that such a product might be obtained by adding urea and antipyrine to quinidine hydrochloride according to the following formula:

So far as we have been able

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