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March 20, 1943

SHOCK IN PHYSICALLY INDUCED FEVER THERAPY TREATED WITH BLOOD PLASMA

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Surgical Service, Stark General Hospital, Charleston, S. C. Lieutenant Pruce is chief of Section of Physical and Fever Therapy.

JAMA. 1943;121(12):935. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.62840120005009b
Abstract

This report on the use of plasma in the treatment of secondary shock following physically induced fever is presented because our armed forces have instituted a rapidly expanding program of fever therapy to treat venereal diseases. Shock is one of the more dangerous complications which may occur during or several hours after sustained high temperature rises induced by physical means. There are no significant differences in the picture of secondary shock whether caused by trauma, surgery or fever therapy. Although plasma has been widely and successfully utilized to combat shock from other causes, this appears to be the first report to describe its use in shock following fever therapy.

REPORT OF CASE  Private J. D. M., a Negro aged 20, was sent for fever therapy because of a chronic sulfonamide resistant gonorrhea of five months' duration. He had a moderately profuse urethral discharge. The prostate culture and urethral spread were

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