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April 10, 1943

SULFATHIAZOLE THERAPY OF FIVE HUNDRED PROSTITUTES WITH CHRONIC GONORRHEA: THE CONTROL OF VENEREAL DISEASE IN WARTIME

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN

From the Department of Hospitals, City of New York.; From the Department of Gynecology Kingston Avenue Hospital, Brooklyn.

JAMA. 1943;121(15):1187-1190. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840150001001
Abstract

Medical history shows that there is a great increase of venereal disease during wartime. Prostitutes are a danger to our military and industrial army. Detailed histories of some of our cases reveal twenty to thirty exposures during a twenty-four hour period. In a metropolitan city like New York with huge naval, military and industrial developments, a center for the armed forces on leave or embarkation, this problem assumes such serious significance that it requires immediate and proper attention.

This paper is based on a study of 615 women, culturally positive for the gonococcus, who were hospitalized at the Kingston Avenue Hospital. They had been arrested for actual or attempted prostitution, tried at the Jefferson Market Court and found not guilty or given suspended sentences. However, since they had gonorrhea, the Health Department immediately ordered them hospitalized for treatment as a means of controlling the spread of venereal disease.

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