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Article
July 18, 1931

RESULTS OF SYMPATHETIC GANGLIONECTOMY AND RAMISECTOMY FOR CHRONIC ARTHRITISTHE PERSONAL EXPERIENCES OF A PHYSICIAN

JAMA. 1931;97(3):172-174. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730030022009

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Abstract

It has been suggested to me that the recording of some personal experiences in the onset, progress and treatment of arthritis might be of interest to the profession, especially the reaction which I, as a physician, have experienced in the newer surgical methods of treatment; e. g., a quadrilateral sympathetic ganglionectomy and ramisectomy.

The onset of arthritis, which was insidious, occurred during the summer of 1926, in the midst of perfect health, while I was residing in upper Egypt, a region commonly considered especially favorable as a place of residence for persons with this disease. My previous residence had been for many years in Arizona, which also justly enjoys the reputation of having a most salubrious climate.

The trouble began in the terminal phalanx of the right index finger and at first resembled the well known "baseball finger," but as there had been no antecedent injury to account for such

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