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April 10, 1943

THE SYNDROME OF UNILATERAL RUPTURE OF THE SIXTH CERVICAL INTERVERTEBRAL DISK: WITH COMPRESSION OF THE SEVENTH CERVICAL NERVE ROOT A REPORT OF FOUR CASES WITH SYMPTOMS SIMULATING CORONARY DISEASE

Author Affiliations

MEMPHIS, TENN.; MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Tennessee College of Medicine, and the Baptist Memorial and the John Gaston Hospitals.

JAMA. 1943;121(15):1209-1214. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840150023006
Abstract

Rupture of a cervical intervertebral disk into the spinal canal has been reported many times. With few exceptions, however, the symptoms were due to compression of the spinal cord rather than the nerve roots. Adson,1 Elsberg,2 Stookey,3 Peet and Echols,4 Mixter and Ayer,5 Hawk,6 Love and his co-workers7 and Bradford and Spurling8 all have reported 1 or more cases of rupture of the cervical disks. Of all these cases only 4 seem to have had nerve root compression without involvement of the spinal cord, and of these 19 was a rupture of the sixth disk. In this particular case the description of the exact radiation of the pain and of the sensory findings was quite limited. Two of the cases10 were not proved pathologically, but there seems to be very little doubt of the diagnosis.

From a review of the

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