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Article
May 1, 1943

WAR AND THE MIGRATION OF TROPICAL DISEASES

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

JAMA. 1943;122(1):1-4. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840180003001
Abstract

The second world war differs in one fundamental respect from any previous conflict recorded in history— the enormous potential hazard of disease to which populations may and probably will be exposed. This will probably not reach its peak during the period of actual warfare, rather in the period of population readjustments following the cessation of hostilities. War and pestilence are no new partners. On many occasions disease, far more than the operations of armies, has determined the outcome of campaigns and the course of political history. Armies on many occasions in the past have, in fact, functioned as traveling reservoirs of infection from which endemic and epidemic diseases have been widely spread through the civilian populations with which they have come in contact. The resulting outbreaks, however, have been more or less restricted to the zone of military operations. As the science of epidemiology has developed, the application of control

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