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Article
May 15, 1943

HYPERTENSIVE TOXEMIA OF PREGNANCY: PREECLAMPSIA AND ECLAMPSIA

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Boston City Hospital, the Medical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1943;122(3):145-152. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840200001001
Abstract

The subject of hypertension in pregnancy is confused by the use of a multitude of ill defined terms and by the lack of critical analysis of the various types of hypertension that may occur during gestation. We have recently studied the problem and have reported our results in detail elsewhere.1 Here it is our purpose to present a summary of this work in an effort to clarify somewhat the present status of hypertension in pregnancy. Our study is based on observations of 100 normal pregnant women, 100 patients who presented generalized edema uncomplicated by hypertension during pregnancy and 80 patients with hypertension during pregnancy.

During normal pregnancy, the blood pressure remains well within the normal range2 of normal nonpregnant adult female subjects. Albuminuria is never a normal finding in pregnancy. The average gain in weight during normal gestation is approximately 21 pounds.3 This is more than can

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