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Article
May 15, 1943

CONTINUOUS CAUDAL ANESTHESIA OR ANALGESIA: A CONSIDERATION OF THE TECHNIC, VARIOUS USES AND SOME POSSIBLE DANGERS

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Anesthesia, Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1943;122(3):152-158. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840200008002
Abstract

To the many recent advances in the rapidly expanding field of anesthesiology, another new method has been added, namely continuous caudal anesthesia or analgesia. The method was introduced as a new means of producing obstetric anesthesia and analgesia but it also has possibilities as a method of anesthesia for certain surgical operations.

Throughout the ages, physicians have been attempting to arrive at a method of anesthesia which would render labor and delivery painless without increasing the hazard to either mother or child. Few, if any, of the methods heretofore developed have even remotely satisfied these three demands. There are certain indications which lead many physicians to believe that continuous caudal anesthesia will meet these demands in most cases. It is only natural that the apparent answer to such an important problem should create intense interest among both the medical profession and the public.1 Many successful results have been reported

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