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Article
May 22, 1943

HUMAN TRICHINOSIS FOLLOWING INGESTION OF BEAR MEAT

Author Affiliations

Albany, N. Y.

JAMA. 1943;122(4):227-228. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.72840210001005a
Abstract

It is generally considered that 90 per cent or more of human trichinosis occurs as a result of the ingestion of pork. However, according to reports from other areas "both bears kept in captivity and those in their native habitat show a definite heavy infection with trichinelliasis."1 Between 1930 and 1935, 29 cases with three deaths were reported by Geiger and Hobmaier as due to the eating of bear meat in California and most of these infections occurred from the ingestion of "jerked meat." These authors mentioned also the possibility of the infection of rats, wild hogs, dogs, cats, foxes, coyotes, badgers and ferrets. As a consequence of their findings they suggested careful disposal of carcasses of any of these animals, especially in cities and zoological gardens.1 Hall2 reports 2 or 3 cases of trichinosis resulting from eating beef, several cases from bear meat and 1 from

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