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Article
May 22, 1943

FOODS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

Professor of Chemistry, Columbia University NEW YORK

JAMA. 1943;122(4):228-231. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.72840210002006
Abstract

NATURAL AND ECONOMIC RELATIONSHIPS  Grouped according to natural relationships and then arranged in descending order of economic prominence, the chief types of food of animal origin are as follows:

  1. Meats, including fish and poultry, which together command about one fourth1 of the average American expenditure for food.

  2. Milk in its various forms, including cheese, cream and ice cream, representing usually one tenth to one-eighth of the food budget.

  3. Butter and other animal fats, about one tenth.

  4. Eggs, about one twentieth.

  5. Shellfish, which occupy but a small place in the nation's food budget but lend interest to variations in the dietary. While this sketch will be systematized largely in terms of this fivefold grouping of its subject matter, it will also be possible to avoid repetition by arranging the discussion according to successive aspects of nutritive value.

PHYSICAL STRUCTURE, PROXIMATE COMPOSITION, PROTEIN AND ENERGY VALUES IN NUTRITION 

Meats, Poultry and Fish 

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