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Article
May 29, 1943

EMBOLIC ARTERIAL OCCLUSION OF LOWER EXTREMITIES: WITH REPORT OF FOUR SUCCESSFUL EMBOLECTOMIES AND A REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Department of Surgery, the New York Medical College, Flower and Fifth Avenue and Metropolitan hospitals, Dr. L. R. Kaufman, director.

JAMA. 1943;122(5):285-289. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840220017004
Abstract

The early recognition and operative treatment of embolic arterial occlusion of the extremities is still relatively infrequent. With the exception of the work reported by Swedish authors, surgical interest and treatment in this condition has been comparatively scant until very recently. It is significant that Deitch1 reports only 10 successful embolectomies in Great Britain up to 1936. I, therefore, believe that my recent experiences with 4 successful embolectomies warrants a report of these cases and a review of the subject of arterial embolism of the extremities.

ETIOLOGY  The most frequent cause of arterial embolus in the systemic circulation is a mural thrombus in the left auricle or left ventricle of the heart—in the left auricle as a result of rheumatic heart disease with mitral stenosis or degenerative heart disease with auricular fibrillation and in the left ventricle as a result of cardiac infarction from coronary occlusion. Other possible causes

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