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Article
June 19, 1943

THE ST. LOUIS AND JAPANESE B TYPES OF EPIDEMIC ENCEPHALITIS: DEVELOPMENT OF NONINFECTIVE VACCINES: REPORT OF BASIC DATA

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; Sanitary Corps, Army of the United States; U.S.N.R.; Cincinnati.

From the Children's Hospital Research Foundation and the Department of Pediatrics of the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.; Dr. Carl E. Duffy collaborated in all the work on the Japanese encephalitis vaccine, Dr. Joel Warren in the early orienting experiments on the St. Louis encephalitis vaccine and Drs. Robert Ward and John L. Peck in some of the later work on the St. Louis vaccine. Dr. Peck's collaboration was made possible by a virus fellowship from the National Research Council.

JAMA. 1943;122(8):477-486. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840250001001
Abstract

The St. Louis and Japanese B types of epidemic encephalitis occur in the late summer and early autumn and are caused by two immunologically distinct viruses. The most recent data favor the concept that these viruses exist in an animal reservoir from which they are transmitted to human beings by mosquitoes.1 Thus far the St. Louis virus has been isolated only in the United States and the Japanese B virus in Japan, the Maritime District of the Far East of the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics2 and in 1940 also in Peiping, China.3 An incompletely studied virus isolated during epidemics in Australia in 1917 and 1925 (Australian X disease4) had many properties in common with the Japanese B and louping ill viruses.

At the suggestion of the Board for the Investigation and Control of Influenza and other Epidemic Diseases in the Army, a study was undertaken

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