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Article
July 3, 1943

PERIPHERAL NERVE INJURIES DETERMINED BY THE ELECTRICAL SKIN RESISTANCE METHOD

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

David T. Katz is Henry Strong Denison Scholar, 1943-1944.; From the Psychobiological Laboratory, Phipps Psychiatric Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;122(10):648-651. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840270006002
Abstract

In previous papers a method was described by means of which areas of high and low electrical skin resistance can be quickly and accurately defined on all parts of the body.1 This method was first applied to the delineation of areas of skin denervated by sympathectomy. These areas did not sweat and had a very high electrical resistance. A sharp line, usually less than 1/8 inch in width, separated the normal areas of low skin resistance from the affected areas of high resistance. Removal of the sympathetic ganglions at any given spinal level produced definite skin resistance patterns which closely conformed to the corresponding sensory dermatomes. This method made it possible to determine exactly the area affected by sympathectomy and the presence of regeneration of the sympathetic nerves.

In a later study with this method, well circumscribed areas of low electrical skin resistance were found in normal individuals at

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