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Article
July 3, 1943

SUCCINYLSULFATHIAZOLE IN THE TREATMENT OF BACILLARY DYSENTERY

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Station Hospital, Fort Bragg, North Carolina.; Lieut. Col. Dwight Kuhns, M. C., and the staff of the Fourth Service Command Mobile Laboratory made the results of their follow-up cultures available. First Lieut. Ivan W. Brown Jr., M. C., and Major F. J. Pohle, M. C., of the laboratory of this station hospital made the bacteriologic studies in the cases reported.

JAMA. 1943;122(10):651-653. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840270009003
Abstract

The history of dysentery runs parallel with the history of wars. Through the centuries it has been the scourge of armies. Its morbidity has decided campaigns. It almost defeated the British at Gallipoli in 1915, when it was responsible for a high proportion of the 120,000 casualties from sickness in that area. Whenever troops are encamped in the field, even in training areas, this disease is apt to occur unless there is constant and unremitting attention to field sanitation.

During a six weeks period in the late summer of 1942 an epidemic of dysentery occurred in a large military organization encamped in the field in North Carolina. The epidemiology and source of this outbreak were studied by Sands and Riley.1 The bacteriology of the epidemic has been investigated by Kuhns2 and his co-workers. The bacteriologic studies of the hospital cases were made by Brown and Pohle.3 It

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