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Article
July 17, 1943

THE TREATMENT OF BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA: IN RELATION TO PROSTATIC CARCINOMA

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Urology, Mayo Foundation; ROCHESTER, MINN.

From the Section on Urology, Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1943;122(12):790-793. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840290010003

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Abstract

Amidst the lively controversy concerning the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia it is imperative for the general practitioner as well as the urologist to keep the purpose of the operation clearly in mind. Stated simply, surgical treatment is undertaken in an effort to relieve the symptoms of urinary obstruction, so that micturition can again be normal. The restoration of normal micturition is the common goal of suprapubic, perineal and transurethral prostatectomy. In an attempt to reach this common goal, each operation is designed to remove the same hyperplastic prostatic tissue. A realization of the pathologic changes which occur in prostatic hyperplasia will aid in elucidating this fact.

Benign prostatic hyperplasia consists in the growth of a single adenoma or multiple adenomas. By the process of growth these adenomas compress the surrounding normal prostatic tissue, thus forming the so-called surgical capsule of the prostate gland. Complete removal of the adenomas

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