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Article
August 7, 1943

WOUND HEALING AND INFECTION AFTER LOCAL IMPLANTATION OF SULFONAMIDE POWDER

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS

From the Department of Surgery of the Washington University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1943;122(15):1003-1006. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840320021005
Abstract

The practice of implanting sulfonamide powder in the wounds of compound fractures after débridement is now well established and is a routine procedure in most hospitals in this country. However, the routine implantation of sterile sulfonamide powder in clean operative wounds for the purpose of preventing infection has not been generally adopted. It is my belief that this is the most important addition to surgical technic since the introduction of rubber gloves and I cannot understand why surgeons have not adopted the method as a routine procedure. It cannot be because they do not encounter operative infections, because I believe that under present conditions the incidence of operative infections is in the neighborhood of 5 per cent. It may be because many surgeons believe that the local implantation of the drug is dangerous or that it interferes with wound healing or that it does not reduce the incidence of operative

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