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Article
August 7, 1943

FATAL AORTIC-ESOPHAGEAL FISTULA FROM A SWALLOWED FISHBONE: REPORT OF A CASE AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

JAMA. 1943;122(15):1011-1012. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.72840320001008a
Abstract

Reports have appeared of fatal hemorrhage resulting from a foreign body in the esophagus. The case presented here emphasizes the need for early esophagoscopy in cases in which a foreign body in the esophagus is suspected. Chevalier Jackson has stated "Esophagoscopy is demanded in every case in which a foreign body is known to be, or suspected to be, in the esophagus." To this dictum might be added only the word "early."

REPORT OF CASE 

History.—  C. S., a Negro girl aged 12 years, was admitted to the medical service of the Jersey City Medical Center on Jan. 16, 1939. She had excruciating pain in the lower sternal and left interscapular areas. The past history and family history contained nothing significant. The present illness began January 6, when, during a meal which included fried fish, the patient complained of a sticking sensation in the midsternal region. The pain increased

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