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Article
August 14, 1943

THORACIC AND LUMBOSACRAL CORD INJURIES: A STUDY OF FORTY CASES

Author Affiliations

Neurosurgeon in Chief and Head of the Department of Neurosurgery, Boston City Hospital BOSTON

From the Department of Neurosurgery, Boston City Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;122(16):1055-1063. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840330001001
Abstract

Injuries to the thoracic and lumbosacral cord have not been granted the study that their importance justifies. If, for example, it had been generally recognized that the mortality of this group of injuries as compared with that of cervical cord injuries is roughly as 6 is to 4 1/2 and that it is this class that includes all the surviving patients with transected cords with their attendant invalidism and problems of rehabilitation, greater attention would have been paid these injuries not only by neurosurgeons but by general and orthopedic surgeons as well. Grinker1 in his textbook of neurology devotes only ten pages to the entire discussion of injuries to the spinal column and cord and states that (p. 182) "treatment of cord injuries is extremely hopeless." Frazier and Allen2 note that severe injuries to the thoracic spine predicate the application of tremendous violence (p. 368) but do not

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