[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 14, 1943

THE PREPARATION AND USE OF RED BLOOD CELL SUSPENSIONS IN TREATMENT OF ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE; MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES NAVAL RESERVE; MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES NAVY

From the Plasma Division, Surgical Service, United States Naval Hospital, Philadelphia.

JAMA. 1943;122(16):1065-1067. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840330011003
Abstract

During the past few years there has been a definite increase in the use of blood transfusion as a therapeutic measure. The improved methods and facilities for collection, preservation and administration of blood, the development of blood banks, a better understanding of the therapeutic value of and indications for blood transfusion, and the increased requirements due to military medicine are probably the factors which are responsible for this increased interest. The present war has also intensified interest in the use of human blood plasma in the treatment of shock, burns and hemorrhage. Experimental and clinical observations have established the fact that plasma is actually more valuable in the treatment of shock and burns than is whole blood. The transfusion of plasma is now, and will continue to be, of increasing importance in military medicine.

The large scale preparation of plasma from whole blood has made available great quantities of red

×