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Article
September 4, 1943

SULFATHIAZOLE ERUPTIONS: SENSITIVITY INDUCED BY LOCAL THERAPY AND ELICITED BY ORAL MEDICATION REPORT OF FOUR CASES WITH SOME ALLERGIC STUDIES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Dr. John H. Stokes, Director.

JAMA. 1943;123(1):17-23. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840360019004
Abstract

Local sulfathiazole therapy is now a well established procedure in the treatment of superficial pyogenic disorders of the skin.1 Most authors considered this to be a relatively innocuous type of treatment, but experience has indicated that unfavorable reactions, some of them quite severe, may occur.2 This report details the types of reactions which have been described following local sulfathiazole therapy and also includes an account of 4 cases with allergic studies comprising our experiences with some of the more spectacular types of reactivity.

Sams and Capland2 reported an example of recurrent contact dermatitis following repeated applications of sulfathiazole powder to the ears for a recurrent chronic dermatitis. Subsequent oral administration of the drug precipitated a severe dermatitis of the ears, followed shortly by a widely disseminate eruption. A patch test with the sulfathiazole powder gave negative results.

Miller2 lists 5 cases of contact dermatitis due to

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