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Article
February 2, 1929

TUBERCULOUS SALPINGITIS SIMULATING RUPTURED TUBAL PREGNANCY

JAMA. 1929;92(5):390-391. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02700310036011
Abstract

The clinical picture of rupture of the fallopian tube with intraperitoneal hemorrhage is so commonly due to the erosive and distensive action of a tubal pregnancy that other causes are not considered. However, inflammation, nutrition disturbance of the tube and the pull of adhesions may produce a locus minoris resistentiae with resulting rupture of a fallopian tube and intraperitoneal hemorrhage. These predisposing factors are uncommon.

Although tuberculous salpingitis is commonly associated with ectopic pregnancy, the clinical manifestations of a ruptured tube due to tuberculosis of the tube occurring in the absence of a tubal pregnancy is rare. A review of the literature discloses only one recent report. Therefore, the following interesting case warrants consideration:

REPORT OF CASE 

History.  —Mrs. M. B., an Italian woman, aged 26, entered the hospital, May 28, 1927, because of severe pain in the lower portion of the abdomen, bloody vaginal discharge, and an amenorrhea of

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