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Article
September 11, 1943

ACUTE TOXIC NEPHROSIS: A CLINICAL AND LABORATORY STUDY BASED ON A CASE OF CARBON TETRACHLORIDE POISONING

Author Affiliations

INDIANAPOLIS

From the Lilly Laboratory for Clinical Research, Indianapolis City Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;123(2):81-85. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840370013004
Abstract

Acute parenchymatous renal injury results from the toxic action of a large number of unrelated substances. Their classification is neither easy nor indeed rewarding, for in most instances the clinical pattern of the poisoning is very similar. Even the microscopic differences in the kidney are not very great. Mercurial nephrosis is selected by Fishberg1 as the typical instance of this type of renal disease; it is of course the one most frequently seen in practice. Nephrosis due to ethylene glycol, dioxane, tartrates and the like is much less common. The renal lesions that develop during cholemia or after intravascular hemolysis or burns or crushing injuries should also be considered under this general heading, since they share a "toxic" cause and a common clinical pattern of proteinuria, oliguria, edema, hypertension and azotemia with more or less characteristically depressed consciousness, and at autopsy the kidneys show epithelial degeneration.

The present report

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