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Article
September 11, 1943

BRONCHOSCOPY AND ASTHMATOID RESPIRATION

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Presbyterian Hospital, Chicago.

JAMA. 1943;123(2):85-87. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840370017005
Abstract

Altered respiration of an asthmatoid type may result from a variety of clinical conditions which produce changes in the caliber of the bronchial lumen. The term asthmatoid respiration is used to imply a type of respiratory cycle in which the expiratory phase is accompanied by a wheezing sound similar to that heard in true bronchial asthma but for which there may be a number of different etiologic factors. My purpose in this paper is to indicate the diagnostic and therapeutic value of bronchoscopy in simulated asthmatic, or asthmatoid, breathing.

The initial impetus in the study of altered respiration, bronchoscopically considered, probably stems from Chevalier Jackson's classic description of the "asthmatoid wheeze."1 Often quoted, the original words bear repeated emphasis: "The asthmatoid wheeze may be defined as a sound heard by placing the ear in front of the patient's mouth during expiration. It resembles the wheezing of an asthmatic patient

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