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Article
October 2, 1943

MENINGOCOCCIC MENINGITIS AND SEPTICEMIA: REPORT OF OUTBREAK IN FOURTH SERVICE COMMAND DURING WINTER AND SPRING OF 1942-1943

Author Affiliations

Medical Consultant, Fourth Service Command, Army of the United States

JAMA. 1943;123(5):264-272. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840400012004
Abstract

Cerebrospinal meningitis has occurred wherever large numbers of troops have been brought together. During and after World War I there were in the United States Army a little less than 6,000 cases in the course of thirty-three months.1 The over all mortality for that series of cases was 39 per cent. Following the war the cases in the civilian population of the United States continued for ten years at a high rate, but by 1930 the incidence of cases had fallen to its usual prewar level.2 For the years 1939, 1940 and 1941 slightly less than 2,000 civilian cases per year were reported for the whole country. The year 1942, however, showed an increase with 3,400 cases during the first eleven months.

In the Fourth Service Command sporadic cases of meningitis occurred during the years 1941 and 1942. The case rate per thousand troops began to increase in

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