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Article
October 2, 1943

FAILURE OF NEPHRECTOMY TO INFLUENCE HYPERTENSION IN UNILATERAL KIDNEY DISEASE

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia; New York

From the Department of Medicine, Temple University Medical School, Philadelphia, and the Department of Physiology, New York University College of Medicine, New York.

JAMA. 1943;123(5):277-279. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.82840400001006
Abstract

Experimental production of hypertension by partial occlusion of the blood supply to one kidney1 has suggested that intrinsic unilateral renal disease in man can similarly cause arterial hypertension. The acceptance of this thesis has led to the search for unilateral disease in hypertensive patients and, when found, to nephrectomy of the suspected kidney. Seventy-six published case reports of attempts to cure hypertensive disease in man by removal of a diseased kidney have been reviewed in detail by Smith, Goldring and Chasis.2 In the opinion of these authors, in only 7 of the 76 patients has nephrectomy been successful in reducing the elevated blood pressure to the normal range.

It has been argued that failure to reduce the blood pressure in a patient with a long-standing unilateral kidney disease and hypertension might be explained on the basis of irreversible vascular changes in the remaining kidney capable of maintaining the

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