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Article
October 9, 1943

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF TYPHOID VACCINE PREPARED BY THE U. S. ARMY

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, UNITED STATES ARMY; SANITARY CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

JAMA. 1943;123(6):319-321. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840410001001
Abstract

Siler and his co-workers included in their monograph "Immunization to Typhoid Fever"1 a historical review of the introduction and use of typhoid vaccine in the United States Army. Briefly, typhoid vaccine was introduced on a voluntary basis by F. F. Russell in March 1909. In 1911 antityphoid vaccination was made compulsory for all military personnel.

From 1909 to 1916 a monovalent typhoid vaccine was used, and from 1917 to 1927 inclusive the vaccine was of a triple typhoid (TAB) type containing typhoid, paratyphoid A and paratyphoid B components. In 1928 the paratyphoid B fraction was omitted, followed in 1934 by the omission of paratyphoid A. Monovalent typhoid vaccine was then used exclusively for antityphoid immunization until September 1940, at which time the paratyphoid A and B components were again added. This is the product now used for the immunization of all personnel in the Army; it contains 1,000 million

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