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Article
October 9, 1943

THE CHEMOTHERAPY OF INTRACRANIAL INFECTIONS: III. THE TREATMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL STAPHYLOCOCCIC MENINGITIS WITH INTRATHECAL ADMINISTRATION OF PENICILLIN

Author Affiliations

NASHVILLE, TENN.

From the Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1943;123(6):330-332. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840410012004
Abstract

The great promise of penicillin as an antibacterial agent has recently received wide publicity, even in the lay press. The discovery of its antibacterial activity by Fleming1 in 1929 and the outstanding investigations of Chain, Florey and their co-workers2 beginning in 1940 have been reviewed by Hobby, Meyer, Dawson and Chaffee3 (who also contributed valuable observations of their own). A recent summary of early clinical observations in Great Britain has been published by the Floreys4 and extensive investigation of the use of penicillin is being carried on in this country.5

The experimental study to be reported herein was undertaken as one of a series of investigations of the treatment of infections of the central nervous system and its coverings.6 This report will be limited to consideration of the effects of penicillin in experimental staphylococcic meningitis.

DEATH WITHIN 8 HRS. DEATH AFTER 24 HRS. DEATH

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