[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 16, 1943

DOES THE UNITED STATES NEED A MEDICAL REVOLUTION?THE WAGNER-MURRAY-DINGELL BILL: I

JAMA. 1943;123(7):418. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840420030010

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The Wagner-Murray-Dingell Bill proposes a complete revolution of medical practice in the United States. Nearly every institution concerned in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease would have to modify its method of rendering service. The type of medical education and research and the administration of hospitals would be grossly altered. The immediate results of revolution are almost always destructive. For several years the institutions that protect and maintain the health of the American citizens would certainly be so disrupted as to make the efficient performance of their functions for the protection of the health of the American people almost impossible.

Is our situation today so desperate as to call for so radical a remedy? Medicine never hesitates to use radical measures when required in desperate situations. Do present conditions indicate defeat in the battle against death and disease? The reverse is true, accord? ing to reliable vital statistics. Never

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×