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Article
October 23, 1943

DOES MEDICAL EDUCATION NEED TO BE REVOLUTIONIZED?

JAMA. 1943;123(8):484. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840430036010
Abstract

THE WAGNER-MURRAY-DINGELL BILL: II  Is the rate of progress in medical education in America so slow and the stage which it has attained so inferior and the hope of further progress so hopeless as to call for a revolution? Those who have observed this progress and present attainments say emphatically "No." At the beginning of this century the American Medical Association first collected and published statistics on the medical school situation in this country.1 In 1904 it created a permanent Council on Medical Education and begana series of annual conferences. In 1909, at the time of the fifth annual conference, only 17 schools required two or more years of college work for admission. Many medical schools were private enterprises depending on tuition for support. A large number made the payment of such tuition almost the only standards of admission, and often of graduation. In 1906 there were 162 medical

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