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Article
October 30, 1943

THE PREVENTION OF EAR AND NASAL SINUS COMPLICATIONS OF THE COMMON COLD

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Department of Otolaryngology, the Johns Hopkins University and Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;123(9):534-536. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840440016004
Abstract

Practically all infections of the ears and nasal sinuses are secondary to acute coryza or nasopharyngitis and are due to bacterial invasions. The primary inciting agent may be a virus, but prolongation of symptoms and complications are caused by pyogenic organisms. Nasal and throat cultures of large numbers of patients with acute coryza show that the predominating type of organism varies from year to year. A group of nurses at the Johns Hopkins Hospital during the winter of 1943 were shown by cultures to have pneumococci in the nasopharynx and pharynx three times as frequently as beta hemolytic streptococci, while during the winter of 1942 beta hemolytic streptococci had been the commoner type. In other years Hemophilus influenzae predominated.

Beta hemolytic streptococci, pneumococci and H. influenzae are the types of bacteria most commonly found in the nose and throat during acute coryza but as mentioned their incidence varies from year

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