[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 30, 1943

SINUSITIS AND INFECTIONS SECONDARY TO THE COMMON COLD: TREATMENT WITH STABILIZED AQUEOUS SOLUTION OF SULFATHIAZOLE SODIUM WITH DESOXYEPHEDRINE HYDROCHLORIDE

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES; BURBANK, CALIF.

From the Research Laboratory, Chemical Division, Lockheed Aircraft Corporation.

JAMA. 1943;123(9):536-537. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840440018005
Abstract

Two years ago Turnbull1 reported that a 5 per cent solution of the sodium salt of sulfathiazole brought greater relief from the symptoms of chronic sinusitis than any other preparation he had used. It relieved congestion, opened the nasal passages, promoted drainage and relieved pressure headaches. The use of sodium sulfathiazole appeared to be a perfectly safe procedure, and the results obtained in cases of sinusitis seemed to justify further investigation. The solution was reported unstable when exposed to light and air, as it tended to crystallize and discolor.

By adding sodium sulfite we were able to make the solution stable to light, air and heat. A vasoconstrictor was then added to the solution, decreasing congestion and thus assisting the antibacterial action of the sodium sulfathiazole. dl-Desoxyephedrine hydrochloride—discovered by Ogata in 1919 and, like the original sulfanilamide, a "sleeper" for twenty years—was found to be compatible with sodium sulfathiazole

×