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Article
November 6, 1943

PINTA (MAL DEL PINTO, CARATE) IN CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES: REPORT OF THREE CASES WITH LATE MANIFESTATIONS AND REVIEW OF THE SALIENT FEATURES OF THE DISEASE

Author Affiliations

Attending Dermatologist, Michael Reese Hospital CHICAGO

From the Department of Dermatology, Division of Syphilis, Michael Reese Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;123(10):619-624. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840450021005
Abstract

Pinta, called also mal del pinto or carate, is a nonvenereal type of spirochetosis limited almost exclusively to the dark races. The initial lesion appears on the cutaneous surface at the exact site of entrance of the causative organism, Treponema carateum, after an incubation period of seven to twenty days. In five months to a year the secondary lesions, or pintids, appear. These are disseminated pink, red, slate blue, brown or black macules and plaques, grouped around the primary lesions. Pintids may resemble the lesions of psoriasis, syphilis, trichophytosis, lichen planus or eczema. They are associated with erythema and, in the form of the disease common in Cuba, with follicular keratosis and palmar and plantar keratoderma. In the terminal stage —the tertiary, or dyschromic, stage—achromic and hyperpigmented spots and atrophy of the skin are encountered. In this stage the complement fixation and precipitation reactions are strongly positive and adenopathy may

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