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Article
November 13, 1943

THE BIOSYNTHESIS OF THIAMINE IN MAN: AND ITS IMPLICATIONS IN HUMAN NUTRITION

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University.

JAMA. 1943;123(11):683-684. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840460017005
Abstract

The thiamine requirements of man are not known with accuracy. The daily allowances recommended by the National Research Council's committee on medical nutrition were based on three experimental studies of induced thiamine deficiency in human volunteers1 which did not show very close agreement in regard to the minimal requirement. The difficulty encountered in experiments of this kind, one which we have experienced ourselves, is the great variation in the thiamine content of natural foods, making it next to impossible to maintain a constant intake when such foods are given. In order to avoid this difficulty and to control thiamine intake accurately we undertook experiments on a synthetic diet in which vitamins were supplied exclusively by a vitamin mixture given with each meal in weighed amounts.

The subjects of this study consisted of 9 adolescent young adult males from 16 to 23 years of age, living a sedentary life in

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