[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 16, 1929

SEROUS SPINAL MENINGITIS (CIRCUMSCRIBED): REPORT OF TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the neurologic and surgical services of the Research and Educational Hospitals of the University of Illinois College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1929;92(11):877-880. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02700370025007
Abstract

The arachnoid membrane is separated from the dura by the subdural and from the pia by the subarachnoid space. The latter, traversed by numerous trabeculae, is the container of the cerebrospinal fluid. Under pathologic conditions, such as observed among others by Mauss and Krüger1 in twenty-three operative cases, membrane-like bands form between the arachnoid and the pia; or portions of the latter become adherent to the arachnoid membrane, occluding whole sectors of the subarachnoid space. The resulting conditions—cysts, thickenings of the pia-arachnoid and adhesions—interfere with the free circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid. Clinically they are known as adhesive circumscribed arachnoiditis, chronic spinal meningitis (Horsley), circumscribed edema of the arachnoid spaces, serous spinal meningitis and leptomeningeal cysts.

Though mentioned by Schlesinger,2 the foregoing pathologic conditions did not attract attention until the publication of a contribution by Spiller, Musser and Martin3 and the subsequent surgical reports of Horsley4

×