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Article
November 20, 1943

SIGNIFICANCE OF PHLEBOGRAPHY IN PHLEBOTHROMBOSIS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; NEW ORLEANS

From the Department of Surgery, Tulane University of Louisiana School of Medicine, and the Ochsner Clinic.

JAMA. 1943;123(12):738-744. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840470004002
Abstract

Although visualization of the venous system is frequently referred to as venography, we believe that, since this is a hybrid word, being derived from both Latin and Greek, phlebography should be used because it has a true Greek origin: [unk], phleps, vein, and [unk] graphein, to write.

Few complications in medicine and surgery are as unpredictable, treacherous and dramatically tragic as the thromboembolic phenomena. Fatal pulmonary embolism in a patient apparently convalescing uneventfully and preparing to leave the hospital is a fearsome and pathetic catastrophe. Whereas the mortality rate in surgical patients has steadily decreased since the introduction of asepsis and continued improvement in surgical technic and anesthesia as well as the more recent development of the sulfonamides, little has actually been accomplished in the control of pulmonary embolism until relatively recently. Indeed there is some statistical evidence to support the belief that the thromboembolic incidence is increasing.1 That

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