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Article
November 20, 1943

FAILURE OF SULFAGUANIDINE THERAPY IN THE CONTROL OF AN INSTITUTIONAL TYPHOID CARRIER

Author Affiliations

Acting Director, Division of Communicable Disease Control, Delaware State Board of Health, and Surgeon (R) U. S. Public Health Service Dover, Del.; Assistant Physician, Delaware State Hospital Farnhurst, Del.

JAMA. 1943;123(12):763-764. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.82840470001009
Abstract

REASON FOR ATTEMPTING CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC CONTROL  In spite of routine typhoid inoculation of all patients and personnel, 4 cases of typhoid occurred in the Delaware State Hospital during the period 1934-1942. This is a hospital for nervous and mental diseases, its annual average census ranging from 1,180 to 1,200 patients. The entire population of the hospital had been immunized against typhoid in 1933, when 4 cases occurred in Ward B East, routine admission immunization being instituted at the same time. All immunizations were the usual three subcutaneous injections of a standard triple typhoid vaccine.In 1933 typhoid developed in a graduate nurse on duty in Ward B East. In 1937 a male patient contracted the disease. He did not live in Ward B East, which is a women's ward, but did help in the hospital laundry serving that ward. In 1938 a female attendant in Ward B East came down with

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